Dunedin Family History Group

Otago and Southland related research

Dunedin

 


Dunedin Cemeteries

Allantown  | Andersons Bay | Anglican Church Waikouaiti  |  Anglican Church Warrington | Arthur Street  Broad Bay | Green Island  Green Park  |  Hyde  |  Robertson Graves  Airlie Bank Otakou Whalers MacAndrew Bay Northern  | Otakau Maori Purakaunui Quarantine Island Southern  | Taieri Beach  Taieri Mouth | Upper Junction  West Taieri  |

Dunedin Cemeteries Database

 This database is for those who want to find information on anyone buried at any Dunedin City cemetery.
Photos of headstones in the Southern Cemetery, have been added to the website, as a project carried out by the Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of NZ.

http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/facilities/cemeteries/cemeteries_search 

 


 

 

Allantown

The township of Allanton on State Highway 1 lies on the east bank of the Taieri River eight kilometres south-west of Mosgiel. Formerly known as Scroggs Creek and then Greytown, the town’s name changed in 1895 to honour James Allan, a prominent early settler. It was also to avoid confusion with Greytown in the North Island

James Allan had established his Hopehill estate in the 1850s near the site of the village and river landing at the junction of the Taieri River with the Owhiro or Scroggs Creeks. Other settlers followed and established farms despite the area being prone to flooding. A settlement sprang up along the main road during the goldrush years. There were two hotels, a smithy and a store. Trade thrived along the river, with ships from Dunedin plying up the Taieri River as far as Taieri Ferry several kilometres downriver, where goods were unloaded into punts and lighters for the river settlements, and for oncarriage towards the goldfields at Waipori. A church was built in 1865 and a school followed in 1873.  German-Polish workers were brought in to help build the Clutha railway southwards in the 1870s and they later turned to farming. Chinese labourers were hired to drain the swamps and they later settled in the district as market gardeners. By 1895 Allanton had a public hall, an athenaeum and three churches as well as a post office located in the railway station.  The Allanton Cemetery is also known as the Greytown Cemetery and the Grey Cemetery. The Allanton Cemetery is ten minutes away from Mosgiel, heading South. Turn at the ’Airport’ signpost off the main road (State Highway 1), at the corner where there is a large display of farm machinery. From there it is only a couple of hundred metres to the cemetery. It is on the left up a steep but fully sealed drive leading to an extensive new sealed carpark at the top of the small hill. The cemetery is administered by the Dunedin City Council. The cemetery has been recently upgraded and tidied and many of the broken surrounds and wrought iron fencing removed some years ago. It now resembles a lawn cemetery.

 

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ANDERSONS BAY CEMETERY(Or the Eastern Necropolis)
The first recorded burial in this cemetery took place in May 1867 and although only about 300 burials occurred in the first 30 years, Andersons Bay Cemetery was to become Dunedin’s largest cemetery with about 40,000 burials, after the closure of the Southern and Northern Cemeteries. Although records start in May 1867 there is evidence from dates on headstones, newspaper accounts and death certificates that there were burials in Andersons Bay Cemetery prior to this date. For example John James Crawford died 8 October 1865 and his daughter Mary Shaw Crawford died 27 September 1863. All evidence leads to their burial at Andersons Bay Cemetery including their names on the headstone but there are no burial records to prove this.
Andersons Bay Cemetery was closed in 1978 and although burials will continue to take place in Andersons Bay Cemetery for many years to come, they will be made in existing plots where space is still available.

Dunedin’s Crematorium is within the Anderson Bay cemetery grounds and the Administration Office for the City’s Cemeteries is incorporated in this building.

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Anglican Church Waikouaiti

 

Waikouaiti is located on State Highway 1 approximately 45 kilometres north of Dunedin. The St Johns Anglican Church and churchyard are located on Beach Street at the south end of the township – when approaching from Dunedin it is the third turnoff on your right. The church and churchyard are located over the railway lines and on your left.

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Anglican Church Warrington

GPS location S45º42.358’ E170º40.153’

The church and churchyard are located approximately 30 kilometres from Dunedin. Heading north out of Dunedin on State Highway 1 turn right at Evansdale towards Warrington on the Coast Road. Do not turn into Warrington but remain on the Coast Road. You will cross a railway level crossing and shortly afterwards encounter a second level crossing. The entrance to St Barnabas Churchyard is adjacent to this crossing. The church is hidden from view behind tall bushes but a large signpost indicates the presence of the church. Entrance to the church and churchyard is through a Lych gate

The foundation stone for St Barnabas Anglican Church was laid on 14 April 1872. This church and churchyard resembles very much what would be conceived as an English village church. A visit to the church, which is usually not locked during the day, is worthwhile just to view the magnificent windows. The chancel window was sent out from England. The windows at the back of the nave are the work of both English and German artists.

The cemetery is very well kept, surrounded by thick bush which is home to beautiful tui. Most of the headstones are covered in moss but there is no sign of deliberate vandalism. A word of caution however, on the two most recent visits we have made to St Barnabas there has been an abundance of wasps present.

The cemetery headstones and burial records have both been transcribed and are available. The transcripts cover 1875-1981. However there have been several new burials in recent times in the cemetery. These new burials (with special seat provided) can be found behind the church building. There is also an ashes berm for cremations.

The burial records for the cemetery tells us that a single plot in the churchyard measuring 8’ x 4’ (240×120 cm) cost £1.10/- in 1875. The last monetary entry in the burial book dated 31 December 1955 shows the amount for burial was still £1.10/-. .

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ARTHUR STREET CEMETERY (Also known as York Place Cemetery and Rattray Street Cemetery)

This was the first cemetery in Dunedin, opened in approximately 1846 and closed in 1858, on the opening of the Southern Cemetery. After closure subsequent burials of further family members were allowed until at least 1865 although many of the existing bodies were re-interred in new plots in the Southern Cemetery.

From November 1861, soldiers of the 70th Regiment of Foot, brought to Dunedin to help maintain law and order at the time of the Gold Rush were camped under canvas at the cemetery site until their barracks were built near the site of the Otago Boys’ High School, further along Arthur Street. The cemetery became an embarrassment to the city as it was not maintained and in 1879 all remaining bodies in the cemetery were re-interred into one large plot, which formed a central mound. A monument (or obelisk as some people prefer to call it) was erected in 1880. All that remains today, of this cemetery, is the monument set in a park-like area with swings and see-saws. The monument is suppose to record the names of those buried in the large mass grave but even as early as 1880, it was suggested that the monument did not record all those still interred in the cemetery.

The Arthur Street cemetery transcripts that are available contain all known burials gathered from different sources.

Arthur Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Broad Bay

The cemetery is very well kept but is exposed to the elements and a sheer cliff at the back of the cemetery looks down into the Otago Harbour. A very pleasant cemetery to visit but not on a windy day.
The cemetery headstones have been transcribed up to 1975.

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Green Island

The suburb of Green Island lies within the boundaries of the Dunedin City and shares its name with an uninhabited island off the coast of Dunedin. The suburb of Green Island is actually not near the sea. Formerly a borough, it took its name from the Green Island bush, a forested area on the hills between the southern boundary of Green Island and Blackhead on the coast, 3 kilometres south of Green Island.

THE ISLAND – Green Island is a small uninhabited island located at 45°57′11″S 170°23′14″E, close to the mouth of the Kaikorai Stream. The island’s Māori name is Okaihae. The Sydney sealer vessel Brothers, chartered by Robert Campbell and under the command of Robert Mason, had a crew of eleven men. In November 1809 Mason dropped eight of the crew on an island off of Dunedin. One of the crew was a man called William Tucker who later settled at Murdering Beach near the Otago Heads. He referred to his time spent on this island as being on the ‘Isle of Wight’. Many believe this reference to be Green Island. However he could have been referring to Taieri Island a few kilometres to the south. If this is the case then Green Island may be the island referred to as ‘Ragged Rock’ where Mason dropped the other three members of his crew. Some of the men claimed to have stayed on these two islands from November 1809 until December 1810. Later, Green Island was referred to as St Michael’s Mount. It is likely it was named after the ship the St. Michael which had been used for sealing along the Otago coast in the 1820s. One of the sealers, Tommy Chaseland, recorded he lost a boat and all its crew when it was dashed on the island while trying to land. Chaseland was the sole survivor and he stayed alone overnight and next day was picked up by another boat.

The name of Green Island may have come from the original name of the Kaikorai Stream. In the survey report on Otago, prepared by the New Zealand Company’s surveyor, Frederick Tuckett in June 1844, he recorded the stream as Green River and the Island off of its mouth as being Green Island.

In the 1880s the island was mined for guano, bird dung used as fertiliser.

THE SUBURB – Green Island has, since 1989, been officially an outer suburb of Dunedin on State Highway 1, eight kilometres west of the Dunedin City centre. The area was first settled in 1848 and a township developed there in the 1850s. It prospered as it was on the main road to the Taieri and then on to the Otago Goldfields.

It was an independent borough from 1875 to 1989. The Green Island Borough Council area changed significantly from the time it was constituted in 1875 increasing over time to include Concord, Burnside and Abbottsford. The inclusion of Abbotsford was effective from 1 April 1974. All of the added areas which were incorporated into the Green Island Borough Council were originally part of the Taieri County Council. Neighbouring suburbs of Waldronville and Fairfield have always been in the Taieri County Council which became Silverpeaks County Council in October 1977.

The Dunedin City Council Archives located in the Civic Centre Building in The Octagon, Dunedin holds the Green Island Borough Council Records 1875-1989. These include Minutes 1875-1894 and 1929-1989, correspondence 1947-1989, rating records 1952-1989 and electoral rolls 1933-1941.

For further information contact the archives at

P.O. Box 5045, Dunedin
or email archives@dcc.govt.nz.

Their website is www.CityofDunedin.com

The township of Green Island boomed in the 1950s and 1960s when new State housing developments brought families to the area.
POST OFFICE – The new purpose-built Green Island Post Office was opened in 1911. It provided accommodation for the post mistress to live on the property. The Post Office closed on 31 March 1990. The building still stands but is currently unoccupied.

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GREEN PARK CEMETERY
When there was no longer any ground available for new plots at Andersons Bay Cemetery, the Dunedin City Council established a new cemetery, named Green Park – situated on the coast road south towards Brighton. The first interment was made on 21 April 1979. Headstones have recently been transcribed from 1979-2005.

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Hyde Cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

The cemetery is two kilometres from Hyde along a narrow unsealed road. It is well signposted. Entrance to the cemetery is through beautiful ornate gates (see photo above). The cemetery was transcribed in 1979 and forms part of the NZSG cemetery headstone transcripts which are available on microfiche. The cemetery has recently been updated by members of the NZSG Dunstan Informal Group. The earliest burial took place in 1867. The early burial records and minute books for the cemetery were destroyed in a fire so the early history of the cemetery is lost. A newer portion of the cemetery was opened in 1932 although this extension was not fenced off until 1939.

Surnames of people buried in Hyde Cemetery

Name
Annett
Bruhns
Beel
Budge
Burnard
Cameron
Christie
Cockerell
Connolly
Coster
Cross
Currie
Donnell
Dowling
Fergusson
Ferry
Fox
Gilchrist
Gill
Goble
Hill
Howard
Keating
Kelly
Kinney
Larkin
Laughton
Laverty
Lynch
McAuley
McBride
McKay
McLean
Mardling
Meade
Moore
Nelson
Nolan
O’Connell
Persson
Prendergast
Ramsay
Read
Redmond
Sebelin
Sinclair
Smith
Tate
Teviotdale
Tomkins
Trotter
Underwood
Wilson
Wisnesky

 

 

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ROBERTSON FAMILY GRAVE AT SANDYMOUNT

William Robertson, his wife Fanny and four sons and six daughters arrived in Dunedin aboard the Silistria in 1860. They farmed a property on

Seal Point Road
at Sandymount on the Otago Peninsula. Fanny died in 1901 and William in 1884. They are both buried on what is now private property not far from where they once farmed. It is believed that at least two of their unmarried daughters, Agnes and Annie, were also buried with them.

The grave is on private property but can be viewed with binoculars from the point where Seal Point Road becomes a car park (start of a walking track from Seal Point Road to Sandfly Bay – great sand dunes down to the beach but one long haul back up). The grave used to be covered with macracarpa trees and at the time Hardwicke Knight, in capturing images of the Otago Peninsula, photographed the grave he wrote “The grave is built about three feet above the ground of the local basalt and covered with concrete. Macracarpa trees branch around the grave being windswept into a labyrinth of twisted branches covering over the grave which is now scarcely visible”.

None of the occupiers of this grave appear in the Dunedin City Council Burial registers as they were buried in a private grave.

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AIRLIE BANK PRIVATE CEMETERY, COMPANY BAY (also appears as the WILSON FAMILY PRIVATE CEMETERY)

The cemetery is located on privately owned farm land with the only access road being a rough track. The cemetery is situated on

Castlewood Road  (formerly known as Wilson Road ) which runs up from Company Bay to Larnach Castle and the Highcliff Road
. The cemetery is on land originally owned by the Wilson Family and the former Methodist Mission Eventide Home was located on what was part of Wilson’s original farm. Known burials at this private cemetery are:

BODDY                       Flora Jamieson               nee Wilson, wife of Walter Boddy

BODDY                       Walter                           son-in-law of Mary Ann Wilson             Died 21 July 1912 aged 40 years

CHRISTIE                    James 1

CHRISTIE                    James 11                       son of Andrew Christie and grandson of James 1

CHRISTIE                    Mary Ann                      wife of James 1                                     Died 8 November 1895

EDWARDS                  Louis

EDWARDS                  Margaret                        nee Duff

DUFF                           Donald                          Father of Margaret                       Died 29 November 1865 aged 75 years

FERGUSON                 Ellen

FERGUSON                 John

WILSON                      James Christie                                                                     Died 23 December 1946 aged 65 years

WILSON                      Mary Ann                      nee Christie                                    Died 30 March 1954 aged 95 years

WINTON                     Jane

Because these are burials in a private cemetery none of the deceased appear in the DCC Burial records. The Boddy, Christie, Ferguson, Wilson and Winton members buried represent four generations of the one family. The Duff and Edwards are related to each other. The only common connections between the two sets of families is James Christie and Louis Edwards formed a business partnership. Donald Duff was Louis Edward’s father-in-law so this may have resulted in the two families being close through business and marriage.

The Duff family arrived in Dunedin aboard the Larkins in 1849 and the Christie family arrived aboard the Philip Laing in 1848.

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OTAKOU – WHALERS CEMETERY

This is believed to be the earliest European Cemetery in Otago. It was first used as part of the Weller Brothers’ Whaling Station at Otakou. This station operated from 1832 – 1841. The original name “Whalers Cemetery” continued in usage although some burials are of non-whalers and of people who arrived in Otago after the whaling ceased at Otakou.

It is believed the Whalers Cemetery had been on the hillside above Wellers Rock. This area is now covered in bush. There is no evidence of headstones or burials. There is also some belief that a smaller earlier cemetery had existed closer to the whaling station but no evidence of its existence can be found today. All that remains of where the whaling station once stood has been obscured as a result of massive sand movement which altered many kilometres of landscape along the Otago Peninsula during the second half of the 1800s.

No burial records exist for the cemetery but the following is a list of possible burials in this cemetery

ANTONE / ANTONI               John

COLEMAN                              Benjamin                       Was at Otakou with his wife and 5 children – arrived in 1840 on the Magnet to work for Johnny Jones at Waikouaiti. The Otago News newspaper 6 October 1849 page 3, column 1 gives a report of his death due to a accident at the entrance to harbour

FORTUNE                               Bob

FOWLER                                 James                            Died 1851 (Pilot)

HANLON                                James

HINE KAITAKI                                                           Maori woman from the North Island

MAITI TAU                                                                  Maori woman from the North Island

MOSS                                       Joseph

MUSSEL                                  Bob                              Died 1846

PHILLIP / PHILLIPINE            John                             Died 1848          (ex Whaler)

SLASHER                               James

SUVAT                                     Peter

TWELVETREE(S)                    Robert

WATSON                                 Oamaru / Oamara

An oil painting by Mrs Jane Colville nee Dick, wife of Alick Colville, is in the possession of the Otago Settlers Museum. It clearly depicts a cemetery in a clearing high on the hill above Wellers Rock and facing slightly towards the Upper Harbour. In the painting the hillside is quite thickly bush clad except for the location of the cemetery which is surrounded by a white picket fence. The painting is dated 1909 and there are many who believe that the white picket fence is a measure of artistic licence as in 1909 any fence would have long since been demolished due to its exposed location.

SO WHO WERE THE WELLER BROTHERS AFTER WHOM WELLERS ROCK IS NAMED?

The brothers, Joseph Brooks (1802-1835), George (1805-1875) and Edward (1814-1893), founded their establishment at Otago Heads in 1831. The early sealers and whalers had been operating on the New Zealand coast for some years when the Weller brothers fitted out the ship Lucy Ann, loaded it with muskets, gunpowder, alcohol, hardware, clothing, stores, and whaling equipment, and set out for New Zealand. They concentrated on the South Island and had interests from Banks Peninsula to Foveaux Strait. In a very short time they had whaling stations in operation and had established a brisk two-way trade between Sydney and New Zealand. The brothers made Otakou the headquarters for their South Island venture. They built jetties, storehouses, wharf buildings, and dwellings. A fire destroyed the station at Otakou in 1832, but it was rebuilt and whale products started flowing from Otago in 1833. Joseph Weller based himself at Otakou, sending his brothers to manage other ventures around New Zealand. In addition to whaling they built up a steady trade in timber, flax, potatoes, dried fish, Maori artefacts, and even tattooed Maori heads which were in keen demand in Sydney. The Weller Brothers continued to buy land across New Zealand. In January 1832, Joseph Weller bought land including the sites of the modern cities of Auckland and North Shore and part of Rodney District.

Joseph Weller died of consumption at Otakou in 1835 and his brother Edward shipped his remains to Sydney in a puncheon of rum. At 21 Edward became the resident manager at Otakou while George maintained the Sydney end of the business. At this time there were 80 Europeans at Otago which had become a trading, transhipment and ship service centre as well as a whaling station. About this time a measles epidemic greatly reduced the Māori population at Otakou. Edward made strategic marriages to Paparu, a daughter of Tahatu and after her death to Taiaroa’s daughter, Nikuru. There were daughters, Fanny and Nani, by each alliance.

By the end of the 1830s exports of whale products were at a peak. Anticipating British annexation, Edward and George started buying land and settling it. But a sudden decline in whales and Edward’s ill health meant he left Otakou in early 1841. He never returned to New Zealand and soon afterward the firm went bankrupt. Edward and George lived out their lives in Maitland in New South Wales, Australia. Edward drowned in 1893.

About five weeks before Edward Weller left Otakou, Bishop Pompallier visited Otago and the first divine service in Otago was held at the Weller’s whaling station on 22 November 1840.

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Macandrew Bay.

Macandrew Bay Cemetery is located on the Otago Peninsula. At Macandrew Bay turn right into Greenacres Street at the Macandrew Bay shopping centre. The cemetery is located behind a hedge just past the Presbyterian Church.
The cemetery is well kept and surrounded by thick bushes and tall trees. Some of the older graves are engulfed by thick bushes.
The earliest record for a burial in the cemetery is 1 January 1867. The cemetery is still currently in use and a cremation berm has now been added.
The headstone have been transcribed up to 1977.
Names appearing on headstones in the cemetery up to 1977 include many families associated with the Otago Peninsula families –

Alexander, Bewley, Blacklow, Booth, Brookman, Burns, Burridge, Busby, Canton, Carnegie, Challis, Churchill, Dick, Donaldson, Dow, East, Forrest, Georgenson, Hellyer, Hely, Henderson, Hinkley, Holmes, Joss, Jury, Kellas, Landreth, Lenly, Macandrew, McClelland, MacFie, McGrath, McMillan, Martin, Michie, Mitchell, Nicholls, Nilsen, Paterson, Raynbird, Reynolds, Rowlands, Shearing, Sim, Stuart, Sudden, Tofield, Urie, Vivian, Walker, Williams and Wilson.

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Northern Cemetery

The Dunedin Northern Cemetery is a major historic cemetery in the southern New Zealand city of Dunedin. It is located close to Lovelock Avenue on a spur of Signal Hill close to the Dunedin Botanic Gardens and the suburb of Opoho, overlooking Dunedin North and Logan Park. The 8-hectare (20-acre) site was set aside in 1872, with the last plot being purchased in 1937. The cemetery forms part of Dunedin’s Town belt, a green belt surrounding the inner city.

The cemetery contains many notable graves and tombs, most prominently the mausoleum of William Larnach, designed by R.A. Lawson as a miniature replica of First Church. Other notable burials and interments include Thomas Bracken and Vincent Pyke.[

There are war graves of 17 Commonwealth service personnel from World War I and 3 from World War II.

The sexton’s cottage at the entrance to the cemetery contains a visitor’s centre. A commemorative lookout, the Bracken Lookout, is located at the southern end of the cemetery, and commands views across Logan Park, the University of Otago and central city.

The Northern Cemetery has its own Website    http://www.northerncemetery.org.nz/

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The Otakou Maori Cemetery
The Otakou Maori Cemetery is located about 25 kilometres east of Dunedin, on the former site of a large ancient Maori settlement. From Portobello Road turn into Tamatea Road. The small cemetery containing the graves of several important chiefs is situated on the hillside behind the Church and meeting House.

The Maori church and meeting house were inaugurated in 1940 on the 100th anniversary of the Treaty of Waitangi which was signed on 13 June 1840 by Otakou chiefs Karetai and Korako on board the HMS Herald moored off Taiaroa Head.

The cemetery is located on a ten acre Maori Reserve which also includes the marae and church. It forms part of the 1,877 hectares on the Peninsula reserved by Kai Tahu from the 1844 sale of the Otakou Block. Some of the original reserve (which extended back to this side of Harwood Township, and included Okia Flat and part of Cape Saunders) has been sold although a sizeable proportion still remains in Maori ownership. This site was chosen in 1859 by chiefs Taiaroa, Karetai and Korako.

The first building to be erected on site was the original church in 1864 (opened 1 January 1865), followed by a school in 1869 and finally the meeting house in 1874. The meeting house was replaced in 1946 by the current meeting house.

The historical church is a Methodist Church but it is administered in an inter-denominational way and many denominations have given blessings in the church. The Reverend Riemenschnieder carved the pulpit which comes from the original church built in 1864. Riemenschnieder had come to Otakou from Taranaki where he was suspected by the local Maori there of being a collaborator with the colonial forces during the land wars of the 1860s.

In the foundations of the church is a blue coloured stone with “1832” on it. This stone is from the doorstep of the Weller brothers’ house, believed to be the first Pakeha house built in Otago.

In the cemetery many of the great chiefs are buried here and when I inquired about some of the history of the cemetery I was told that, like most cemeteries, there are a large number of unmarked graves. I was asked to advise our members that visitors to the cemetery are always welcome but they should show respect and ‘tread carefully.’

There appears to be no burial records held for many of the early burials in the cemetery. The earliest burial appears to have been in 1854 and the branch has transcribed the headstones up to 1976.
.

Names from the headstone transcripts include:

Edmonds  Karetai  Rapatins
Ellison  Kent  Rehu
Erihana   Koaki  Retera
Erueti   Korako  Russell
Forsyth   Langsbury  Robertson
Gray  Lewis  Spencer
Hansard   Ngatata  Taiaroa
Hennig  Noble  Tamihana
Irirapeti  Paana  Waiscott
Jolly   Pohau   Wesley
Kaahu  Potiki  Weteri

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 Purakaunui

Today Purakaunui is a rural and seaside district 25 kilometres north of Dunedin. It is surrounded by communities at Long Beach, Mihiwaka, Osborne and Heywards Point. Purakaunui was spelt as Purakanui for many years and the school retains this spelling.

Purakaunui was once a centre for Kati Mamoe whose defensive pa Mapoutahi fell to Kai Tahu invaders in the 1700s. The large (nui) pile of bodies (purakau) gave the district its name. A model of the pa is in the Otago Museum.

It was briefly used as a whaling station in 1838. Early pilots on the Otago harbour, Richard Driver and John Washburn Hunter, were early settlers at Purakaunui. It was surveyed for settlement in the 1860s and bush clearers shipped firewood to Dunedin about the coast. Railway construction which resulted in a long tunnel and heavy cliff cuttings brought in about 300 workers who were served by two stores, a hotel and a school which opened in 1873. Many of these early railway workers were Chinese.

By 1905 it still maintained one store, a post and telegraph office and railway station but the hotel had closed down. The school had two rooms to accommodate 80 pupils and two teachers. There was ten acres of land attached to the headmaster’s residence which contained six large rooms.

Fire twice destroyed the school in the mid 1990s but it was rebuilt on each occasion.

A Presbyterian church was established in 1898. Marriages performed in this church can be found in both the Port Chalmers Presbyterian Church records or the Blueskin and Merton Parish (Waitati) records. Visit the following website for an index to these marriages

<http://archives.presbyterian.org.nz/marriageregisters/synodregionmarriages.htm>

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s it became a holiday centre for people from Dunedin. Although many people still have holiday homes here it is becoming popular again as a residential area for people willing to commute to Dunedin.

A short history of the Purakanui area can be found in the booklet “Purakanui” by Alex Sime, first published in 1950.

Further information can be found in “Te Pari Rehu; The Misty Cliffs” by Stan Durry and Dawn Paterson and published by the Long Beach Amenities Society Inc in 1998.

MIHIWAKA

Mihiwaka is situated nine kilometres north of Port Chalmers, on the road to Purakaunui. Mihiwaka is at the head of the stream which flows into the Purakaunui estuary. The completion of the Mihiwaka tunnel in 1877 saw the area prosper with a busy railway station serving cottages, holiday home owners and the local residents from a wide area. The station was very important for freight traffic, particularly between 1930 and 1958. The combination of traffic volume and the steep gradient meant a pusher engine based at Sawyers Bay had to be attached to the head of each north-bound freight train. It was detached at Mihiwaka where its water tanks were refilled before it returned for the next trip. In its hey day this could be as often as four times in one night. The station was closed for passengers in 1971 and for freight in 1973.

LONG BEACH

Long Beach is situated about eleven kilometres north-east of Port Chalmers. In the 1920s it was promoted as the safest beach south of Timaru. European settlement is believed to have begun when William Pavletich, a hotel-keeper of Dunedin, received most of the land now occupied by the township of Long Beach as a Crown Grant in 1876. The land remained in the Pavletich family as a farm until 1921 when it was bought by James Halliday Spencer, a coal merchant and carrier and co-founder of the Dunedin firm, Spencer and Dunkley. For many years the Pavletich family let people camp during their Christmas holidays, along the beach, under lupin and marram grass-covered dunes. Spencer was aware of how popular the area was for holiday makers so he planned to turn the farming location into a holiday township. Spencer arranged for the land to be sub-divided and the sections auctioned in November 1922. All sections sold quickly.

The grass domain behind the beach was used as a camp and parade ground for National Reserve Troops during the Japanese Invasion scare in 1942.The cliffs above the camp was a mass of gun emplacements and machine gun pits, some of which are still visible. Today the cliffs are used for rock climbing.

PURAKANUI CEMETERY

Purakanui is located 23 kilometres north of Dunedin on the coast via Port Chalmers. The cemetery is located in Boundary Street on a sloping hillside, on the left of the Main Road running into Purakanui Township between Mopanui and Ridge Street. No cars can be taken into the cemetery and it is recommended that sturdy footwear be worn during the winter months. The cemetery is not easily visible from the road but can be identified by a steep driveway down to a cyclone gate.

CEMETERY RECORDS :

The cemetery was opened in 1877 and was controlled by a Trust until 1975 when control passed to the Waikouaiti County Council, which was part of the Silverpeaks County Council. In 1989 Silverpeaks County Council amalgamated with the Dunedin City Council and the Purakanui burial records are now available at the Crematorium office located at the Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin.

The first burial appears to be that of Helen Murray who died of heart disease on 31 January 1877.

~~HEADSTONE TRANSCRIPTIONS:The cemetery has recently been re-transcribed and records for 1877 to 2005 are available to consult.

NAME OF DECEASED      DATE OF DEATH             AGE
BAIRD Agnes11 Aug 1953 77 years
BAIRD David29 Mar 194976 years
BIRRELL Charles23 Sep 1904  77 years
BIRRELL Jane15 Jun 1909  78 years
BROWN Elizabeth29-Nov-21
CASSEY Ernest Douglas1 Jul 1903 3 years
CLEAVLAND Elizabeth4 Aug 1884  34 years
CLEAVLAND Freddy30 Aug 1891  infant
CLEAVLAND Willie30 Aug 1891  infant
CRAWFORD Agnes2 Mar 1897  2 years
DOBINSON Tom29-Jan-03  81 years
DOUGLAS Alexander3 Oct 1908  82 years
DOUGLAS James17-Dec-04
DOUGLAS Thomas 31 Aug 1919  38 years
DRIVER Adam6 Nov 19091 week
DRIVER Agnes7 May 189013 years
DRIVER Annie Elizabeth17-Mar-2871 years
DRIVER Charles30-May-3969 years
DRIVER Charles Richard9 Aug 1910
DRIVER Elizabeth66 years
DRIVER Ethel16-Sep-5558 years
DRIVER Frederick10 Sep 194377 years
DRIVER Isabella Anderson7 Mar 195783 years
DRIVER Isabella C18 Jan 194574 years
DRIVER James Clifton11 Jan 195747 years
DRIVER Richard junior5 Jun 189343 years
DRIVER Richard seniorMar 1890
DRIVER Thomas  11 Oct 193265 years
DRIVER Thomas Cooper    2 Sep 1936 31 years
DRIVER William    9 Jan 1937 24 years
FOOTE Amy Annie  20 Jun 1937 54 years
FOOTE Catherine15-Nov-18
FOOTE Catherine20-Dec-48  77 years
FOOTE Charlotte9-May-42
FOOTE Edward 2 Aug 1957 6 hours
FOOTE Elizabeth18 Oct 1936 68 years
FOOTE Gertrude Winifred25 Jul 1971 83 years
FOOTE Gwendoline 27 Mar 1958
FOOTE Herbert Fredrick 2 Jan 1957 70 years
FOOTE John15 Apr 1934 59 years
FOOTE John  23 Nov 1918
FOOTE Kathleen Charlotte5 Dec 19264½ years
FORGIE Elizabeth30 Jun 1939
FORGIE William9 Apr 189351 years
GOLIGHTLY Margaret 18 Jun 188444 years
GOLIGHTLY Susan 14 Nov 18811 year
GRAHAM Agnes 13 Sep 193165 years
GRAHAM Amos 13 Feb 193373 years
GRAHAM Elizabeth 24 Sep 193672 years
GRAHAM Elizabeth Mary 25 Mar 192926 years
GRAHAM Francis Robert 18 Mar 192319 years
GRAHAM Thomas  1 2 May 190279 years
HALL Joseph
HANNAN Margaret Joan    17 Aug 196214 years
HARRIS Ada     1 Oct 194585 years
HARRIS George 4 Nov 192871 years
HARRIS John  30 May 195971 years
HENRY George H29-Sep-4368 years
HENRY James 10 Nov 1921
HENRY Leslie Charles 12 Jun 1924
HENRY Margaret21 Aug 195065 years
HODGSON Ann 30 Oct 192795 years
HODGSON George Charles             31-Jan-1213 days
HODGSON Jonathan  31 Dec 188949 years
HORN Francis  26 Jun 190128 years
HORN Mary Ann Dorcas  1 Jun 190169 years
HORN Robert  16 May 195488 years
HORN Robert  22 Jun 1910
HUNTER Mary Ann  10 Dec 188967 years
JOHNSON JohnFeb 188484 years
JOYCE John Miliman James             12 Dec 1970         70 years
LARKINS Richard19-Jun-40
LONG Elizabeth21-Sep-46 85 years
LONG James Ward26 Dec 1952   86 years
MAWSON Grace27 Jul 1930   72 years
MAWSON Harold1 year
MAWSON Irene Mary9-Aug-23   27 years
MAWSON William12-Oct-54   70 years
MAWSON William17-Dec-11   64 years
MAWSON William2 Jul 1889   84 years
McGUIRE J (female)24 Mar 1889
McKESSAR Emma7 Jan 1900   46 years
McLACHLAN Christina29 Aug 1930   68 years
McLACHLAN Dougal27 Jun 196491 years
McLACHLAN Dugald20 Nov 191581 years
McLACHLAN Ellen Kihau20-Jun-5878 years
McLACHLAN Mary18 Nov 190267 years
MIDDLEDITCH Philip T.25 Nov 195158 years
MILLER Emma30 Apr 192766 years
MOUAT James Charles1 Jun 193864 years
MOUAT Maria19 Jul 192685 years
MOUAT William Gilbert3 Aug 195692 years
MURRAY Helen31 Jan 187752 years
OBEN Leeson Corbett24 Jul 198274 years
OWER Ann Jane26-Jul-10 
OWER George Gregor25 Nov 191374 years
PAGE William18-Jul-16
POLLOCK Wm Marshall10 Oct 189057 years
RICHAN Philip John22 Jun 195215 months
ROLLINS Arthur22 Mar 189368 years
ROLLINS Elizabeth26 May 189868 years
ROLLINS John29 Oct 1893 22 years
ROSS Dorothy23 Jul 1917 66 years
ROY Christina Mabel18-Oct-40  32 years
STEVENSON Sarah Annie19 Jun 1962  73 years
STEVENSON Thomas Murray         24-May-63  77 years
THOMSON Flora26 Sep 1903  53 years
THOMSON Frederick17-Nov-19 69 years
WARREN Mary 3 Jul 1938
WARREN Thomas27 Jun 1968  73 years
WIX infant stillbornMar 1886
YOUNG Agnes22 Dec 1923 69 years
YOUNG Agnes22 Jan 1945  61 years
YOUNG Charlotte Wilson18-Jan-70  76 years
YOUNG David14 Aug 1967  76 years
YOUNG David2 Jul 1927  88 years
YOUNG Elizabeth27-Dec-09  75 years

 

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Quarantine Island Cemetery

Quarantine Island Cemetery is located on Quarantine Island in the Otago Harbour. The Island is also known as St Martin Island and Kamau Taurua. It is 14 hectacres in size.

In July 1863 the Island was first used as the official quarantine station for immigrants with infectious diseases. John Dougall was appointed as the “Keeper of Quarantine” and three generations of his family lived on the Island.

The cemetery is located on the south side of the Island on a sloping hillside facing towards Dunedin and 72 people are believed to be buried there. Will Dougall, the second keeper on the Island, recorded the total as 72 but only 45 deaths and burials are actually recorded. The wooden headstones have long since disappeared and the Dougall family grave is the only headstone of any substance still in existence. There is also a badly broken headstone erected for an infant Italian baby, the son of Nicola and Susana Azzereti, who died in 1875.

In the First World War soldiers with VD were sent to the Island from other parts of New Zealand and from overseas and later, in the post-war influenza epidemic, soldiers were quarantined there. However, those soldiers who died there in 1918 are buried in the Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin.

Burials took place here from 1863-1916 but the Island operated as a quarantine station from 1863-1923 when it was closed. Death dates cover 1863-1918. The three deaths in 1918 were soldiers returning from overseas who died of influenza. There are no burial records held for the Island.

Despite the fact it is believed there are a total of approximately 72 burials on the Island only 62 burials can be accounted for and are listed on the following pages.

All deaths were registered by the Keeper of Quarantine on the Island. However just because a death was registered by the Keeper of Quarantine it does not necessarily mean that the burial took place at Quarantine Island. A number of deaths took place on board ship on arrival, either in the harbour or at the wharf and burial took place in Port Chalmers, usually at the Old Port Chalmers Cemetery. These deaths were often registered by the Keeper of Quarantine but the deceased was never on the island. Also it is believed people died on the island but their body was removed for burial in other Dunedin cemeteries.

Therefore a true and accurate record of exactly who is buried on the Island will probably never be known.
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INSCRIPTIONS
Stone One

Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Ann Dougall  Died 12 November 1865 aged 7 years

William Dougall died 30 January 1871 aged 5 years

Margaret Dougall died 27 December 1884 aged 24 years

John Alexander Dougall beloved father of the above who died 12 January 1890 aged 63 years

Thou Art Not Forgotten, Children Dear Nor Ever Wilt Thou Be  As Long As Life And Memory Last We Will Remember Thee
Stone Two

In Dio Giace Il Bambi No Filio Di Nicola E. Susana Azzereti Nato E Morto Il 27 Otobre 1875

(transcript of the original wording in misspelt Italian – translates to: In God Here Lies The Baby Son Of Nicola And Susana Azzereti. Born and Died 27 October 1875)

There is also a cairn in the cemetery with a memorial plaque to Dave Wilson (Rev David Joseph Wilson), caretaker on the Island from 1984-1994. He died on the Island on 20 February 1994. His ashes are buried in Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin.

The cairn has been placed on what was the burial site of George Wilson, a soldier who died on the Island from smallpox. George Wilson was buried on Quarantine Island but reinterred in Soldiers Section, Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin.

KNOWN BURIALS ON QUARANTINE ISLAND

AZZERETIMale1 day27 October 1875
BARNESGeorge12 months10 November 1873
BATEYSarah4 1/2 years7 January 1880
BATHGATEFemaleUnder 5 years26 December 1870
BENNETTBabyNewbornDecember 1876
BENNETTJames19yrs1 March 1873
BENNETTMrsDecember 1876
BROPHYMary11 months12 June 1874
CAMERONJohn8 months12 January 1880
CLARKPeter John4 months18 January 1880
CORNWELLCharles3 years21 March 1874
COULTERElizabeth (nee Graham)30 years21 January 1878
COXDavid3 years13 March 1874
CRUICKSHANKWilliam21 months12 January 1880
DICKSONJohn52 yearslate July 1863
DOUGALLElizabeth Ann7 years12 November 1865
DOUGALLJohn63 years7 January 1890
DOUGALLMargaret24 years27 December 1884
DOUGALLWilliam5 years30 January 1871
FEELICK or FELLICKCharles or William7 years19 November 1873
GARDINERJane10 months30 March 1874
HALLIMANHannah (nee Murphy)7 February 1876
HARRISMalesmall infant3 June 1894
HIGGSJulia12 months18 February 1874
HUSBANDMabel3 years3 March 1874
JOHNSTONMary9 years9 March 1874
JOHNSTONEAda3 years14 February 1874
JONESCharles1 year12 June 1874
JONESEmma2 years12 June 1874
KAYJanet (nee Anderson)July 1863
KEEBLELilly5 years18 November 1873
KELLYWilliam1 year 6 mths18 July 1863
LOVEArthur Albert1918
MacDONALDJane33 years28 October 1875
MAIRRobert2 1/2 years27 February 1873
McKENNACatherine18 years27 December 1878
McMASTERSKate (Mrs)27 years18 December 1876
MOIRJessieearly 20’sSeptember 1863
NEWBURYFlorence Emily20 months11 June 1874
PARTELCarls2 months26 March 1874
PEERLESSGeorge18 years10 November 1873
PIKELaura2 years6 November 1873
PRESTONWilliam28 years22 February 1873
RAMSDENFrederick Griffith2 years9 January 1890
REEVEWilliam Henry2 years9 June 1874
RENDALLRobert1918
RICHMONDFemale5 weeks3 August 1874
SANDFORDGeorge17 years28 February 1873
SINCLAIRElizabeth2 years 7 mths18 January 1880
SMITHRichard Wetherell15 months1 October 1875
SPEDDIESydney B.1918
TAITHugh23 September 1864
TANNERAnn20 years31 March 1874
TANNERMargaret17 years30 March 1874
TRIPPCharles10 months14 February 1874
UNKNOWNSeaman from Manilla29 December 1877
UNKNOWNSeaman from Mauritius18 January 1892
WELLENEliza1 year9 June 1874
WELSHMary11 months16 January 1880
WILSONGeorge (soldier)
WITHAMElizabeth12 months21 February 1874
WITHERSWilliam8 years10 April 1874
WITHYMANMalesmall boy1873
WRIGHTBabystillborn5 October 1879

 


 

 

 

SOUTHERN CEMETERY


The Southern Cemetery was opened in 1858 on the site, which was known as Little Paisley. So named by a group of Scottish settlers from Paisley, Scotland who arrived in Dunedin aboard the “Philip Laing” in 1848. Tired on the conditions in the Immigration Barracks they squattered on the site until finally they were granted a portion of land each. Weavers by trade, they planned to establish their industry there but by 1858 only John Barr and his family remained on the site.

ANGLICAN (CHURCH OF ENGLAND) AND ROMAN CATHOLIC BURIAL RECORDS – The Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches were responsible for keeping the burial records for their areas in the Southern Cemetery up until 1941. At that date their individual burial records were handed over to the Dunedin City Council. It is believed that the very first burial records, dating from 1859 and 1861 respectively, were destroyed years ago. It appears that, at some stage, both Churches rewrote their records into more substantial registers, and again, when they were handed over to the D.C.C., it would appear that yet another rewrite was made, by their own clerks. Therefore there was plenty of opportunity for mistakes, omissions and confusion. Definitely approach these records with a certain amount of caution regarding their authenticity and use a back-up source to confirm the information you find.

THE GENERAL (OR PRESBYTERIAN) BURIAL RECORDS – The burial records for the General Portion give a great deal of information regarding the deceased person. It has been noted on many occasions, that more can be learnt from these burial records regarding a pre 1875 death, than can be seen on an official Death certificate of that time. Even if you have a pre 1875 certificate in your possession it would be wise to also consult these burial books.

JEWISH BURIAL RECORDS – The Jewish Congregation generously made their burial records available for transcribing. There appears to be a complete record of burials from 1863 to 1893, but then there is an unexplained gap of 50 years. Recording resumes in 1946 and is probably more or less complete from then on, however, many of these burials (1946-1982) did not take place in the Southern Cemetery. So this Burial Books becomes a burial record of the Jewish Community rather than a burial book for the Jewish Portion of the Southern Cemetery.
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Taieri Beach Cemetery
Taieri Mouth, a small fishing village located at the mouth of the Taieri River, 40 kilometres southwest of Dunedin (18 kilometres southwest of Brighton) in the Clutha District.

There was a Maori occupation site at Taieri Mouth, where moa bones have been found. According to oral tradition in the early 18th century Chief Tuwiriroa moved from Tititea on the Kawarau River near Queenstown and built a pa near Taieri Mouth. A rival, Tukiauau, had already built a pa inland on the Taieri Plain by Lake Waihola. Tuwiriroa had a daughter, Haki Te Kura, who is famous in Maori legend for swimming across Lake Wakatipu. Tukiauau had a son Korokiwhiti. As with all great love stories, the daughter and son of these two rivals fell in love and the girl’s father strongly disapproved of the relationship vowing to hunt down the boy’s father and kill him. When Tukiauau heard this he forbid his son to see the girl again and decided to abandon the upriver settlement and move his people further south. As Tukiauau’s people came down the river in their canoes the distraught young girl saw her lover and attempted to jump from a rock into her lover’s canoe but struck the prow and was killed. Tukiauau pulled her body from the river and adding insult to injury he severed her head and held it up angrily to her people on the shore as the flotilla passed by. As one would imagine there were repercussions and Tukiauau and his son were pursued and eventually killed. On the north bank, about three kilometres upstream from the rivermouth, is the cliff Te Rerenga, known locally as “Maori Leap” in memory of this tragic episode. .

Dr Edward Shortland, private secretary to Governor Hobson in 1841, and Police Magistrate and Sub-Protector of Aborigines accompanied, in 1843, Colonel Godfrey as interpreter and native adviser during the South Island land claims investigation. While on this journey he took the first census of the South Island Maoris. He spent a month in the Otago area, and recorded visiting a small Maori settlement at Taieri Mouth in 1843. The Maori settlement was still believed to have been there in 1850 but disappeared soon after.

During the first half of the nineteenth century whalers and settlers exploited the rich supply of whales and seals in this area. The whaling stations at Taieri Mouth, Port Molynuex and Tautuku had, by the end of the 1840s, depleted the resource so much that the whalers abandoned the stations. They did leave behind some elderly whalers who remained in the area. One of the early European settlers at Taieri Mouth was one of these former whalers who was known locally as ‘The Hermit of Taieri Mouth’, or ‘John Bull’ but whose real name was John Edward O’Neil. He is remembered for his boisterous ways and prodigious strength and John Bull Gully at Taieri Mouth was named after him.

The only cemetery in the area is at Taieri Beach, three kilometres on from Taieri Mouth. There were some early burials on a small plot of land, known locally as Graveyard Point, on the eastern side of the Taieri Mouth to
The Taieri Beach cemetery is still open for burials and is reasonably well maintained. Photographs 1 and 2 on the left show some of the damage to older graves in the cemetery, in contrast with photograph 3, which shows some more modern burials. There appears to be several plots with many generations of the same family buried.

The cemetery is well worth a visit although many of the older headstones are badly worn and very difficult to read.

The Taieri Beach Presbyterian Church which closed in 1976 was located in an adjoining section to the east of the cemetery. The church building was sold for removed in 1979 and all that remains today is a vacant paddock.

Taieri Beach Cemetery headstones have been transcribed and cover the period 1879-1979. This transcript also includes incomplete burial records.

For the period 1879-1909 there are no burial records for the cemetery but dates from inscriptions on headstones clearly indicates the cemetery was being well used in this time period.
Milton Road
No records exist as to who was actually buried in this cemetery. A Lands and Survey map, draw up in 1896, shows the Taieri Mouth Settlement on the south side of the river as the proposed town of Hull. It indicates a cemetery marked on the hill directly in line with the then Taieri Mouth Ferry. However this cemetery was never commissioned

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Taieri Mouth

Taieri Mouth, a small fishing village located at the mouth of the Taieri River, 40 kilometres southwest of Dunedin (18 kilometres southwest of Brighton) in the Clutha District.

There was a Maori occupation site at Taieri Mouth, where moa bones have been found. According to oral tradition in the early 18th century Chief Tuwiriroa moved from Tititea on the Kawarau River near Queenstown and built a pa near Taieri Mouth. A rival, Tukiauau, had already built a pa inland on the Taieri Plain by Lake Waihola. Tuwiriroa had a daughter, Haki Te Kura, who is famous in Maori legend for swimming across Lake Wakatipu. Tukiauau had a son Korokiwhiti. As with all great love stories, the daughter and son of these two rivals fell in love and the girl’s father strongly disapproved of the relationship vowing to hunt down the boy’s father and kill him. When Tukiauau heard this he forbid his son to see the girl again and decided to abandon the upriver settlement and move his people further south. As Tukiauau’s people came down the river in their canoes the distraught young girl saw her lover and attempted to jump from a rock into her lover’s canoe but struck the prow and was killed. Tukiauau pulled her body from the river and adding insult to injury he severed her head and held it up angrily to her people on the shore as the flotilla passed by. As one would imagine there were repercussions and Tukiauau and his son were pursued and eventually killed. On the north bank, about three kilometres upstream from the rivermouth, is the cliff Te Rerenga, known locally as “Maori Leap” in memory of this tragic episode. .

~~Dr Edward Shortland, private secretary to Governor Hobson in 1841, and Police Magistrate and Sub-Protector of Aborigines accompanied, in 1843, Colonel Godfrey as interpreter and native adviser during the South Island land claims investigation. While on this journey he took the first census of the South Island Maoris. He spent a month in the Otago area, and recorded visiting a small Maori settlement at Taieri Mouth in 1843. The Maori settlement was still believed to have been there in 1850 but disappeared soon after.

During the first half of the nineteenth century whalers and settlers exploited the rich supply of whales and seals in this area. The whaling stations at Taieri Mouth, Port Molynuex and Tautuku had, by the end of the 1840s, depleted the resource so much that the whalers abandoned the stations. They did leave behind some elderly whalers who remained in the area. One of the early European settlers at Taieri Mouth was one of these former whalers who was known locally as ‘The Hermit of Taieri Mouth’, or ‘John Bull’ but whose real name was John Edward O’Neil. He is remembered for his boisterous ways and prodigious strength and John Bull Gully at Taieri Mouth was named after him.

The only cemetery in the area is at Taieri Beach, three kilometres on from Taieri Mouth. There were some early burials on a small plot of land, known locally as Graveyard Point, on the eastern side of the Taieri Mouth to

The Taieri Beach cemetery is still open for burials and is reasonably well maintained. Photographs 1 and 2 on the left show some of the damage to older graves in the cemetery, in contrast with photograph 3, which shows some more modern burials. There appears to be several plots with many generations of the same family buried.

The cemetery is well worth a visit although many of the older headstones are badly worn and very difficult to read.

The Taieri Beach Presbyterian Church which closed in 1976 was located in an adjoining section to the east of the cemetery. The church building was sold for removed in 1979 and all that remains today is a vacant paddock.

Taieri Beach Cemetery headstones have been transcribed and cover the period 1879-1979. This transcript also includes incomplete burial records.

For the period 1879-1909 there are no burial records for the cemetery but dates from inscriptions on headstones clearly indicates the cemetery was being well used in this time period.

Milton Road No records exist as to who was actually buried in this cemetery. A Lands and Survey map, draw up in 1896, shows the Taieri Mouth Settlement on the south side of the river as the proposed town of Hull. It indicates a cemetery marked on the hill directly in line with the then Taieri Mouth Ferry. However this cemetery was never commissioned

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Upper Junction

 

Upper_Junction

 

 

 

 

LOCATED ON THE SITE OF THE FORMER UPPER JUNCTION SCHOOL

GPS location: S 45° 49.890 E 170° 33.880

The only school records to have survive cover 1929-1946. These are held in two volumes in the Hocken Library and there is no restriction on their usage. There is also annual examination class lists for the school held at the Hocken Library.

The Hocken Library also holds a folder of photographs and other material relating to the two reunions for the Mount Cargill and Upper Junction Schools held in 1933 and in 1985.

In, what was the playground of the school, seventeen native beech trees were planted to remember ex-pupils of the school who died in the Great War (1914 – 1918). A plaque was placed at the bottom of each tree with the name of the soldier.

Although the area is now somewhat overgrown all of the seventeen plaques have survived.

From the site there is a great view of Dunedin looking down towards North East Valley. To access the site you need to park across the road so be careful crossing the road as cars come around the corner quickly and don’t expect pedestrians.

The original “Roll of Honour” board from the school was destroyed in 1945. However the late Mr W. Winter, a former pupil at the school, had a photograph of the board and transcribed it in 1991.

The board read as follows:

On fames eternal camping ground,

Their silent tents are spread,

And glory guards with solemn round,

The bivouac of the dead.

1914 THE GREAT WAR 1918

AITCHESON A. HERRING, W.

AITCHESON, W. HOULAHAN J

ANDERSON, J. HILEY, A.

ANDERSON, W. B. IRELAND L.

BARNETT, M. JEFFREY, C.

BLAIR, D. JEFFREY, T.

BRENNAN, F. LAMONT, S.

BROWN, R. LEES, F.

CHAPMAN, G. LEWIS, T.

CLEAVE, G. McGREGOR, A.

CLEAVE, J. McGREGOR, J. M.

COLLINS, D. MORTON, W.

COLLINS, T. PAISLEY, A. B.

DUNN, T. SAINSBURY, E.

FITZPATRICK, E. SAINSBURY, W.

FITZPATRICK, T. SPARROW, R.

GARRY, A. SUDDEN, F.

GREEN, A. WINTER, C.

GREEN, H. WINTER, D.

HALL, C. WINTER, H. L.

HARVEY, C.

DIED ON SERVICE

AITCHISON, W.

BARNETT, C.

BRENNAN, A.

BRENNAN J.

BRENNAN, R.

BRENNAN, W.

COLLINS, J.

DONALD A.

HARVEY, B.

LAMONT, A.

PAISLEY , A.

PAISLEY A. K.

PAISLEY , H.

SAINSBURY, E.

SHAW, G.

WILLIAMS, J.

WINTER, W.

So what can we find out about the seventeen ex Upper Junction school boys who gave their live in the 1914-18 war?

Using the Internet site <www.cwgc.org> and the NZSG CD “New Zealand World War 1 Service Personnel and Reserves Index” available in our branch library, I have been able to positively identify 12 of the 17 men listed. EX UPPER JUNCTION SCHOOL BOYS WHO ARE REMEMBERED ON PLAQUES ON THE FORMER SITE OF THE UPPER JUNCTION SCHOOL.

1. AITCHISON, WILLIAM ALEXANDER

Private 69046 Died 23.10.1918 Age unknown

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Romeries Cummunal Cemetery, France

Son of Mrs. T. Aitchison, of North East Valley, Dunedin

2. BARNETT, C.

No further information available

3. BRENNAN, ADOLPHUS MICHAEL

Private 8/1941 Died 23.03.1915 Age 19

New Zealand Training Unit

Buried – Karori Cemetery, Wellington

Son of Mrs. J. Brennan, of 59 Melbourne Street, Dunedin (sic).

4. BRENNAN, JOHN

Gunner 11/859 Died 11.10.1917 Age unknown

New Zealand Field Artillery

Buried – Divisional Cemetery, Belgium

Son of Francis and Jane Brennan, of Upper Junction, Dunedin

5. BRENNAN, RICHARD MORTIMER

L/Corporal 58832 Died 08.10.1918 Age 21

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Marcoing British Cemetery, France

Son of Jane Brennan, of 49 Macandrew Road, South Dunedin, and the late Francis Brennan.

6. BRENNAN, WILLIAM

Private 8/1707 Died 29.06.1916 Age 21

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery, Armentieres, France

Son of Francis and Jane Brennan, of Upper Junction, Dunedin.

7. COLLINS, JOSEPH DANIEL

Trooper 9/1806 Died 14.11.1917 Age unknown

Wellington Mounted Rifles, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel

Brother of P. Collins of North East Valley, Dunedin.

8. DONALD, ANDREW ALEXANDER

Private 8/656 Died 23.10.1918 Age 25

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Son of David and Elizabeth Donald, of 32 Norwood Street, North East Valley, Dunedin.

9. HARVEY, BRUCE

Private 8/1497 Died 07.08.1915 Age unknown

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Turkey

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harvey, of Upper Junction, Sawyer’s Bay, Dunedin.

10. LAMONT, A.

May have been Carl William McAllan Lamont.

11. PAISLEY, ALEXANDER

Sergeant 8/689 Died 08.05.1915 Age 22

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Twelve Tree Copse (New Zealand) Memorial, Turkey

Son of John and Agnes Paisley, of Upper Junction, North East Valley, Dunedin.

12. PAISLEY, ANDREW KEIR

L/ Corporal 8/2693 Died 12.10.1917 Age 26

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Belgium

Son of John and Agnes Paisley, of Upper Junction, North East Valley, Dunedin.

13. PAISLEY, HAROLD WILLIAM

Private 58920 Died 22.02.1919 Age 22

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Glasgow Western Necropolis, Glasgow, Scotland – (Glasgow was one of the ports of embarkation for the British Expeditionary Force in 1914 and several military hospitals opened in the city during the First World War).

Son of John and Agnes Paisley, of Upper Junction, North East Valley, Dunedin.

14. SAINSBURY, EDWARD

Private 11345 Died 04.01.1918 Age unknown

Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F.

Buried – Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Sainsbury, of Queenstown. Served in Egypt and on the Western Front, 1916.

15. SHAW, G.

Believed to have been George Shaw. There are several George Shaw’s who died in the First World War so have been unable to identify him.

16. WILLIAMS, J.

Believed to have been James Andrew Brown Williams.

17. WINTER, W.

Believed to be William Winter. .

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West Taieri Cemetery

 

The Cemetery Reserves Management Ordinance of 1864 (see Topic Outline) instructed the Superintendent of Otago, with the advice and consent of the Provincial Council, to reserve from sale and set aside land in the West Taieri District for the purposes of a Public Cemetery for the interment of the dead.
The area set aside contained three acres and one rood less or more being the north part of section number 16 Irregular Block West Taieri District as delineated on the Record Map of the district.

The West Taieri Cemetery is located approximately two kilometres south of Outram at the corner where State Highway 87 branches uphill from the Taieri Plains towards Middlemarch.

The cemetery is clearly visible from the road and has two entrances. It is now classed as a closed cemetery. No more plots will be sold but burials will continue to take place in existing plots. There are about 515 sites in the cemetery although many of them are bare in the older part.

It is a beautiful, historic, well kept cemetery and worthy of a visit, whether you have relatives buried there or not.

The cemetery headstones have been transcribed from 1859-1979 and are available in hardcopy and on microfiche in most repositories around Dunedin. The good news is the headstones are currently in the process of being updated to 2007 and this new transcript will be available shortly. The transcripts of the burial records for the cemetery should also be available.

If you are researching records relating to burials in the West Taieri Cemetery it is very important that you read the following explanation on the history of this cemetery’s burial records. Transcribers have been working from burial data contained on alphabetically arranged cards. Each card has columns to record name, age, burial date (but not death date), block and plot number. All deceased persons with the same surname appeared together on a card for that surname, whether they were interred in the same plot or were quite unrelated. There is no explanation as to how or when these cards were compiled but it is believed these are not the original burial records for the West Taieri Cemetery. One possible explanation was the burial register had become worn from use and the entries were transcribed onto the cards and the original registers discarded. If this is the case it must have happened just prior to 1924 as the majority of the entries were written by the same hand up until that year.

The first card in the drawer reads: “no burials July 1910 – May 1924”. However there are a number of burials on the cards during this time period, making this comment very confusing.

A systematic day by day search of the Otago Daily Times newspaper death and funeral notices during the years about 1904-1915, certainly reveal many positive and probable interments in the West Taieri Cemetery which do not appear in any of the West Taieri cemetery records. At least 31 deceased persons were located during this exercise.

In addition to the newspaper records, many entries not appearing on the cards have the name, dates and plot location from the headstones. These have also been added to the burial index.

Those involved in creating the Dunedin City Council (DCC) database used the headstone inscriptions to record many burials not contained in the card burial registers. One such headstone entry in the database records the death of James Hannah aged 4 years in 1853, some eleven years prior to the official setting aside of the cemetery land. James may have been interred elsewhere. There are nineteen deceased persons recorded in the database between 1853 and the end of 1863, who are also recorded on headstones. There is no indication as to whether or not they were interred in the cemetery or merely named with other family members and actually interred elsewhere. It has found that while transcribing headstones and burial records throughout Otago that cemeteries did exist and many burials did take place in them prior to their official establishment. The earliest card burial is that of Elizabeth Emma Blatch aged 21 years who died 30 August 1867. A total of 37 interments prior to that date are recorded in the burial transcription.

A close study of the card burials also reveal many incomplete entries. Many of the cards lack a burial date or burial location or age. Occasionally only a surname is recorded with no other details. In addition, someone has later crossed out details with a “correction” without explanation as to why. It is often impossible to judge whether or not the “correction” is more accurate than the original.

From May 1924 until September 1989 a well bound, robust register has survived. This has columns to record name, age, occupation, death date (but not burial date), Block and Plot number. The majority of these records have also been transcribed onto the Card burials, with the inevitable result of some inconsistencies between the two.

As the cards record burial date (and no death date) and the register records death date (and no burial date), the transcribing of one to the other leaves most dates open to question. If another opinion as to the accuracy is sought from the headstone inscription, the researcher is quite likely to have a third date on which to ponder.

While on the subject of dates, the DCC database design requires a day, month and year to be entered in all death and burial date fields. Should the cards, register and headstone lack all or some of these dates, the data enterer was required to record something from their own judgement !!!

The DCC Cemetery database has been adapted for the purposes of printing the West Taieri transcript, allowing all dates to appear as they are recorded, that is, a month and the year only, if that is as it was originally shown. Some “estimated” dates in the DCC Cemetery database have been proved to be in error by up to five years.

There is also available a REGISTER OF PURCHASE OF ALLOTMENTS. This is a well bound and robust register which resembles the Interment Register in shape and size. There are columns for plot, block, purchaser’s name and area of residence, date of purchase and price.

Entries are recorded by date, with the first recorded plot sold to Mrs James Borrie on 14 July 1869.

The writing in this register is quite magnificent with such consistency in presentation that it is believed all the purchases from 1869 to about 1915 were penned at the same time by the same person. So in reality this register may only be a transcript which cannot now be compared with the original record.

The entries from 1915 onwards appear to have been written when the plot was sold. However, some corrections and / or additions which have been noted over the years with insufficient explanation at the time, has now caused doubts to their meaning or accuracy.

A selection of the surnames associated with the cemetery are:

NAME
Adam
Adams
Ah Chin
Aitken
Alexander
Anderson
Andrews
Ashby
Ashley
Barker
Barry
Bathgate
Batty
Baxter
Beattie
Bell
Bewley
Birchall
Birrell
Bisset
Black
Blatch
Bohm
Bolitho
Borrie
Borthwick
Boyd
Bradshaw
Braithwaite
Brearty
Bremner
Brennsell
Briggs
Broadway
Brown
Buchanan
Burnett
Butler
Cameron
Campbell
Carnie
Carr
Carruthers
Cartwright
Cassey
Cattan
Cattanch
Chapman
Cheyne
Chisholm
Choie
Christie
Clark
Clutterbuck
Clyde
Cochrane
Colloty
Colquhoun
Cook
Cookson
Cooper
Craw
Crawford
Crocket
Crosbie
Cross
Crossan
Crossen
Cunningham
Currie
Cuthbert
Cuthbertson
Dalziel
Dark
Davis
Deans
Dick
Dickie
Docherty
Doherty
Doodeward
Dow
Downie
Drummond
Duff
Dugan
Duncan
Ede
Edwards
Elder
Elliot
Enright
Falconer
Farquharson
Ferguson
Findlay
Fisher
Flockhart
Foot
Forrester
Fraser
Frew
Fulton
Gamble
Gellately
Gennings
George
Gibb
Gibson
Gillies
Gilmore
Glendining
Godwin
Goldsmith
Goodlet
Gordon
Gorman
Gowan
Graham
Grainger
Grant
Gray
Green
Greig
Gridgeman
Gunn
Hamilton
Hannah
Hanson
Harper
Harris
Hartley
Harvey
Harvie
Hastie
Hay
Hayes
Headland
Healy
Heckie
Heenan
Henderson
Hendry
Hessey
Higgins
Hodge
Hodges
Howell
Hughes
Ireland
Jack
Jackson
Jamieson
Jeff
Johnston
Jones
Jonniss
Joseph
Josling
Junge
Kelly
Kempshell
Keppel
Kerr
Kiely
Kinlock
Kirkland
Laing
Lane
Langwell
Laurenson
Lawson
Leask
Leslie
Lewis
Light
Lindsay
Little
Lott
Lovell
Low
Lyall
Lyon
Mackay
Mackintosh
Mann
Manson
Marchbank
Marshall
Martin
Mather
Matheson
Mathson
Meade
Melville
Meldrum
Millar
Miller
Milligan Mills
Milne
Mitchell
Monk
Monson
Moodie
Moore
Morgan
Morley
Morris
Morrison
Morton
Muir
Mull
Munro
Murray
McAndrew
McArthy
McBrearty
McBryde
McCammon
McCann
McCaw
McCulloch
McDiarmid
MacDonald
McDonald
McDowall
McEwan
McFarlan
McGeorge
McGown
McGregor
McHardy
McHattie
McIndoe
McInnes
McIntosh
McIntyre
McKay
McKellar
McKelvey
McKelvie
McKenzie
McLachlan
McLarne
McLean
McLeery
McLennan
McLeod
MacMillan
McMillan
McNeill
MacPherson
Neale
Neill
Nicolson
Nicol
Nidd
Nimmo
Norres
Obbard
O’Brien
Olive
O’Neill
Orlowski
Orna
Osbourne
Owen
Ownley
Panting
Parker
Parish
Parsons
Paterson
Patterson
Paul
Paulin
Pearce
Peat
Peen
Petrie
Pettigew
Phillips
Pogson
Pollock
Popham
Price
Proudfoot
Ramsay
Reade
Reid
Reynolds
Richards
Robertson
Robinson
Robson
Rollinson
Ross
Rundle
Russell
Ruthven
Sampson
Savage
Sawers
Scambler
Scannell
Scott
Seed
Senior
Shand
Sharpe
Shaw
Shennan
Shepherd
Sherriff
Shirlaw
Shrimpton
Sim
Simpson
Sinclair
Smellie
Smith
Smyth
Snell
Snow
Southgate
Spalding
Sparks
Sprott
Stanaway
Steele
Stuart
Stevenson
Stewart
Strean
Summers
Sutherland
Swan
Tapper
Taylor
Tily
Thomson
Thornton
Todd
Townrow
Tree
Tripp
Trumbland
Tunnage
Turain
Turnbull
Turner
Turpin
Twaddle
Tweed
Twelftree
Waddel
Walker
Wallace
Walsh
Warnock
Warren
Waterfall
Watkins
Watson
Watts
Weaver
Webb
Welham
Wells
Welch
Wheeler
White
Whitelaw
Whyte
Williamson
Wilman
Wilson
Wright
Wyer
Wyllie
Young
Yunge

 

  

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